Physical activity improves sleep, endurance, and even sex

Physical activity improves sleep, endurance, and even sex

The bottom line \r\n\r\n

Inflammation isn’t a lone villain cutting short millions of lives each year. The truth is, even if you could completely eliminate inflammation – sorry, not possible – you wouldn’t want to. Quashing inflammation leaves you vulnerable to deadly infections. Your body couldn’t effectively respond to allergens and toxins or recover from injuries. \r\n\r\n

There’s no quick or simple fix for unhealthy inflammation

Inflammation is complicated. While acute inflammation is your body’s natural, usually helpful response to injury, infection, or other dangers, connecting singles coupons it sometimes spins out of control. We need to better understand what causes inflammation and what prompts it to become chronic. Then we can treat an underlying cause, instead of assigning the blame for every illness to inflammation or hoping that eating individual foods will reduce it. \r\n\r\n

To reduce it, we need to detect, prevent, and treat its underlying causes. Yet there is good news. Most often inflammation exists in your body for good reason and does what it’s supposed to do. And when it is causing trouble, you can take steps to improve the situation. “,”excerpt”:”

Inflammation is the body’s response to an injury, allergy, or infection, a reaction that attempts to restore the health of the affected area. But that’s only part of the story, because there are two types of inflammation, and it’s important to know the difference-and what is and isn’t true about all types. “,”short_excerpt”:”\n

Inflammation is the body’s response to an injury, allergy, or infection, a reaction that attempts to restore the health of the affected area. But that’s only part of the story, because there are two types of inflammation, and it’s important to know the difference-and what is and isn’t true about all types. \n “,”description”:null,”author”:null,”slug”:”why-all-the-buzz-about-inflammation-and-just-how-bad-is-it-202203162705″,”sort_date”:”2022-03-16T.000000Z”,”contentable_type”:”App\\Models\\Marketing\\BlogPost”,”contentable_id”:2705,”replacement_content_id”:null,”landing_page_landing_page_group_id”:null,”ucr_content_id”:”BL031622″,”publication_date”:”2022-03-16T.000000Z”,”last_review_date”:null,”imported_at”:”2022-03-17T.000000Z”,”last_import_type”:”update”,”last_modified_date”:”2022-03-16T.000000Z”,”active”:1,”created_at”:”2022-03-16T.000000Z”,”updated_at”:”2022-03-17T.000000Z”,”deleted_at”:null,”images_remapped”:0,”old_product_id”:null,”old_content_id”:null,”hide_ads”:0,”primary_content_topic_id”:44,”ecommerce_type”:”CATALOG”,”authors”:[<"id":23,"cr_id":2,"featured":1,"hhp_staff":0,"hidden":0,"name":"Robert>

Dr. Robert H. Shmerling is the former clinical chief of the division of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and is a current member of the corresponding faculty in medicine at Harvard Medical School. As a practicing rheumatologist for over 30 years, Dr. Shmerling engaged in a mix of patient care, teaching, and research. His research interests center on diagnostic studies in patients with musculoskeletal symptoms, and rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. He has published research regarding infectious arthritis, medical ethics, and diagnostic test performance in rheumatic disease. Having retired from patient care in 2019, Dr. Shmerling now works as a senior faculty editor for Harvard Health Publishing. “,”image_url”:”https:\/\/d2icykjy7h7x7e.cloudfront.net\/authors\/OdKCKaVzyx3xPsUxIBc9zJz8m3zvysnJa3UJsGOd.jpg”,”twitter_username”:”RobShmerling”,”created_at”:”2021-05-11T.000000Z”,”updated_at”:”2021-12-17T.000000Z”,”deleted_at”:null,”pivot”:<"content_id":17109,"author_id":23,"sort_order":1>>],”contentable”:<"id":2705,"comments_open":1,"created_at":"2022-03-16T.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-03-17T.000000Z","deleted_at":null,"media":[]>,”content_type”:<"id":18,"name":"blog","slug":"blog","created_at":"2021-05-11T.000000Z","updated_at":"2021-05-11T.000000Z","deleted_at":null>,”media”:[<"id":12448,"model_type":"App\\Models\\Marketing\\Content","model_id":17109,"uuid":"d32ee6b2-3eed-42d0-9e51-347cfa2f2b02","collection_name":"contents","name":"eb95aaa9-ebcb-40bb-8bac-21c5648bdb3c","file_name":"eb95aaa9-ebcb-40bb-8bac-21c5648bdb3c.jpg","mime_type":"image\/jpeg","disk":"s3","conversions_disk":"s3","size":66578,"manipulations":[],"custom_properties":[],"generated_conversions":<"micro":true,"thumb":true>,”responsive_images”:[],”order_column”:12433,”created_at”:”2022-03-16T.000000Z”,”updated_at”:”2022-03-16T.000000Z”,”full_url”:”https:\/\/domf5oio6qrcr.cloudfront.net\/medialibrary\/12448\/eb95aaa9-ebcb-40bb-8bac-21c5648bdb3c.jpg”>],”prie”:”Staying Healthy”,”old_names”:null,”slug”:”staying-healthy”,”description”:”

A healthy diet is rich in fiber, whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, “good” or unsaturated fats, and omega-3 fatty acids. These dietary components turn down inflammation, which can damage tissue, joints, artery walls, and organs. Going easy on processed foods is another element of healthy eating. Sweets, foods made with highly refined grains, and sugar-sweetened beverages can cause spikes in blood sugar that can lead to early hunger. High blood sugar is linked to the development of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and even dementia.

The Mediterranean diet meets all of the criteria for good health, and there is convincing evidence that it is effective at warding off heart attack, stroke, and premature death. The diet is rich in olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts and fish; low in red meats or processed meats; and includes a moderate amount of cheese and wine.

Physical activity is also necessary for good health. It can greatly reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, breast and colon cancer, depression, and falls. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise every week, such as brisk walking. Strength training, important for balance, bone health, controlling blood sugar, and mobility, is recommended 2-3 times per week.

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